Recipes

Quick and easy dried apples

Thursday, July 14, 2016
Our abundant crop of Granny Smith apples are perfectly suited to drying. So simple to prepare. Just peel, slice,  a quick easy natural  pre-treatment  with salt, lemon or lime juice and then into a dryer  and they  are transformed into a versatile and nutritious snack . The natural fruit sugars are  concentrated during the process and offset the characteristic slightly refreshing  flavour of the Granny Smith. Named after Maria Ann Sherwood , the Granny Smith, with its Australian heritage has become an Aussie icon.  Put some dried apples in the lunch box,  take on road trips and nibble on instead of sugary snacks or  mix with other dried  fruit and nuts for a treat while hiking.They can be enjoyed any time of the day and any time of the year.    Read More . . .
 

Apricot Jam

Monday, February 15, 2016

Apricots, the queen of stone fruits with their intense, tangy yet contrastingly sweet luscious flavour, make a truly magnificent jam. There is excitement in our household as the apricot season approaches. Born out of the cold of winter, early spring buds, coaxed by the warmth of the changing season, produce delicate  blossoms which are magically transformed  into “golden eggs" filled with an intense golden orange nectar  This simple recipe produces an full flavoured  apricot  jam that will become a household favourite. 

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Plum and Ginger Chutney

Thursday, January 30, 2014

The sweet and tart flavours of plums marry perfectly with the heady spice combination of ginger, cloves and allspice to produce this distinctive chutney. Allspice is the dried berry of the Jamaican pepper tree and it’s used extensively in pickling solutions and in its powdered form in  preserves and baking. Often referred to as pimento, it is readily available in the herb and spice section of supermarkets.I used our home grown Santa Rosa plums which produced an intense purple coloured chutney.    Read More . . .

 

Pickled Plums - Italian Style

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Use dark plums for this Italian inspired pickled plum recipe. The aromatic spices, sweetened vinegar and plum nectar produce an opulent accompaniment. The cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, whole allspice berries and fresh ginger add to its depth and complexity. Serving pickled fruit is traditional in many European cuisines to offset the richness of  game meats, duck, turkey, goose, pork and terrines. Pickle a jar or two while they are abundant for  a special treat throughout the year,  for the Christmas roast or as a special culinary gift.    Read More . . .

 

Sumptuous Strawberry & Silvanberry Jam

Wednesday, January 01, 2014

Berries herald the beginning of summer and  combining strawberries with silvanberries produces  a rich complex flavoured jam with underlying blackberry tones.  Preserve the taste of summer by making this simple but sumptuous conserve. Spread on hot buttery toast:its intense colour and flavour excites the palette, kindles the heart and fires the imagination. Or serve with pancakes or waffles, with scone and cream for a wicked afternoon treat, with vanilla ice-cream, between heavenly sponges, in fairy cakes and jam tarts. The possibilities are endless.    Read More . . .

 

Fresh Tomato Sauce

Monday, November 04, 2013

During the peak tomato season when the tomatoes are plentiful and full of flavour, I make litres of fresh tomato sauce and preserve it. As a pantry staple it’s always on hand to add to soups and casseroles, lasagne and as a base sauce for baked, stuffed vegetables such globe artichokes, capsicum, cabbages leaves or zucchini. Best of all though, within minutes, it can be reheated and tossed with freshly cooked pasta, extra fresh basil and served with parmesan cheese for a quick, healthy meal on days when I’ve had a full day in the garden and come in tired and hungry.    Read More . . .

 

Preserved Lemon

Monday, October 14, 2013

The salty sour combination of preserved lemons may sound unusual but it really works! Their versatility is beginning to be recognised beyond their point of origin in North African and Middle Eastern cuisine. Try adding chopped preserved lemon to rice dishes, salad dressings, salads that contain fetta cheese or olives or to the stuffing for roast chicken or fish and you’ll be surprised at the freshness and zing it adds. This is an essential pantry item for any adventurous cook or kitchen gardener. It may take 4 weeks to mature before you can use them, but it’s definitely worth the wait. Over winter preserve some lemons for yourself and friends as they also make a wonderful culinary gift.    Read More . . .